Posted 6 months ago

"Bob had gotten to the point where he never drew anything. Never drew anything on the Batman comics, anyway. [Sheldon] Moldoff was ghosting them all and when he didn’t, someone else did. The only thing I think Bob ever drew was when we’d be out somewhere, in a restaurant or someplace, and a pretty girl would come over to him and say, ‘Are you really the man who draws Batman?’ Then he could whip out a little sketch for her, a big sketch if she was wearing something low-cut and would bend over to watch him draw.

One day I’m over at his house to discuss this newspaper strip idea we had and he’s talking about who we might get to draw it. I was going to write it and we were going to get someone else to draw it. I’m not sure what Bob was going to do on it except sign his name. I said to him, ‘Bob, isn’t it disappointing to you that you don’t draw any more? You were once such a great artist.’ He wasn’t but you had to talk to Bob that way.

He said, ‘Oh, no. Let me show you something.’ He took me into a little room in his house. It was his studio. I didn’t even know he still had a studio. It was all set up with easels and things and there were paintings, paintings of clowns. You know the kind. Like the ones Red Skelton used to do. Just these insipid portraits of clowns, all signed very large, ‘Bob Kane.’ He was so proud of them. He said, ‘These are the paintings that are going to make me in the world of art. Batman was a big deal in one world and these paintings will soon be in every gallery in the world.’ He thought the Louvre was going to take down the Mona Lisa to put up his clown paintings. I didn’t have the heart to tell him.

So a few months later, I’m up at DC and I ran into Eddie Herron. Eddie was another writer up there and we got to talking and Bob’s name came up. Eddie said, ‘Did you hear? Bob’s getting sued by one of his ghost artists.’

I said, ‘How is that possible? Shelly Moldoff’s suing Bob? But they had a clear deal. Shelly knew he wasn’t going to get credit or anything…’

Eddie said, ‘No, not Shelly.’ Bob was being sued by the person who’d painted the clowns for him…”

Arnold Drake (via arecomicsevengood)

this worldending idiot is the guy that gets the credit for “creating” Batman btw, not the guy who actually did all of the work 

(via constellation-funk)

Can’t wait to kick Bob Kane’s ass in the afterlife.

(via bigredrobot)

Will always reblog this story. 

(via phoning-it-in)

Hash Tag The Clown Painting Story

(via twentypercentcooler)

The fact that DC’s current Batman books say “Batman created by Bob Kane” with no mention of Bill Finger is an absolute disgrace.

Posted 7 months ago
iamdavidbrothers:

fullofwhoa:

downlo:

theteratophile:

jalwhite:

fracturedrefuge:

whatgodzillasaidtogod:

talldarkbishoujo:

wretchedoftheearth:

I’ve never seen a GIF of this.

I was just reading about this during a wiki binge on Olympics incidents and did a little research on it. I never knew how deep the message was that Smith and Carlos were trying to send. Just about everything they wore and how they wore it had symbolism attached to it. (unzipped tracksuits for solidarity with blue collar workers, necklace of beads for lynching victims, etc) Calling it a “black power salute” is really reductive and it’s a shame (and predictable) that if it’s taught at all, that’s what it’s boiled down to.
Another thing I didn’t know: the Australian guy who came in second wore a patch for solidarity with them, he was protesting racist Australian immigration policies. When he passed away, Smith and Carlos were pallbearers at his funeral.

Don’t know what this is referring to? Here you go.

This is really powerful.

Wow, I had no idea about the solidarity patch.
This is still so powerful to watch.

(fyi Australian guy’s name is Peter Norman, he was banned from competing internationally for Australia after this, because our government can be a real sack of dicks sometimes)

I had no idea there was so much going on here. It’s fascinating. According to the Wiki article:

The two U.S. athletes received their medals shoeless, but wearing black socks, to represent black poverty. Smith wore a black scarf around his neck to represent black pride, Carlos had his tracksuit top unzipped to show solidarity with all blue collar workers in the U.S. and wore a necklace of beads which he described “were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the middle passage.” All three athletes wore Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) badges after Norman, a critic of Australia’s White Australia Policy, expressed empathy with their ideals. Sociologist Harry Edwards, the founder of the OPHR, had urged black athletes to boycott the games; reportedly, the actions of Smith and Carlos on 16 October 1968 were inspired by Edwards’ arguments. Both U.S. athletes intended on bringing black gloves to the event, but Carlos forgot his…It was…Peter Norman, who suggested Carlos wear Smith’s left-handed glove, this being the reason behind him raising his left hand…differing from the traditional Black Power salute. When “The Star-Spangled Banner” played, Smith and Carlos delivered the salute with heads bowed, a gesture which became front page news around the world. As they left the podium they were booed by the crowd. Smith later said “If I win, I am American, not a black American. But if I did something bad, then they would say I am a Negro. We are black and we are proud of being black. Black America will understand what we did tonight.


Every time I learn more about this part of history, I think angrily back to the co-worker who once suggested that a Nazi swastika carried the same level of hate as any kind of Black Power salute/symbol.
At the time I knew next to nothing about Black Power (and I still probably only know a tiny bit). So while I knew she was way off-base (because of those two only the Nazis perpetrated genocide, obv, so there is absolutely no comparing them whatsoever!), I didn’t disagree with her as vehemently as I should have, due to my own ignorance.
It pisses me off that for me, the Black History Month education I received in school basically stopped after the 1960s. Hell, we weren’t even taught anything about Mandella, and this was the late 90s. I’m 28, and it’s only in the past five years that I fully realized that there was lots of European colonization in African countries! Somehow in my absorption of knowledge throughout my life and history education I’ve received, that stuff never made its way in front of me, and I didn’t know enough to look or ask.
But I realize even the anger I have about not being informed about more of the struggles and organized protest and activism from African-descended people (be it American, Canadian, etc), is a sign of white privilege, because I was able to go through most of my life without ever needing to think about it much.
Anyways. History education is important, and it needs to be holistic and inclusive because fuck it, history is not all about the white dudes in power.

I love this. The photo is one of my favorite images, and the act itself is thunderous. I like the commentary up top, too.I do want to quibble with one bit from further up the thread, though: "Calling it a “black power salute” is really reductive and it’s a shame (and predictable) that if it’s taught at all, that’s what it’s boiled down to."
I would argue against it being a shame or reductive, personally. Black Power was never just black liberation. It was liberation, it was anti-police brutality, it was food clothes and shelter, it was education, it was helping the needy, it was uplifting the community—it was a platform to make the world better for everyone, not just Negroes. Bobby Seale was explicit about the struggle being one of class and economics, not race. Race was a side effect, a pressing issue, but if you could tackle the class aspects, you could better everyone’s lives, including our own.
And obviously there’s levels to this, depending on where you stand as far as black nationalism, isolationism, violence, protest, and so on, but overall, I am happy to call this a Black Power Salute and all the meaning and subtext behind it.

I’ve never seen this is in motion. Powerful stuff.

iamdavidbrothers:

fullofwhoa:

downlo:

theteratophile:

jalwhite:

fracturedrefuge:

whatgodzillasaidtogod:

talldarkbishoujo:

wretchedoftheearth:

I’ve never seen a GIF of this.

I was just reading about this during a wiki binge on Olympics incidents and did a little research on it. I never knew how deep the message was that Smith and Carlos were trying to send. Just about everything they wore and how they wore it had symbolism attached to it. (unzipped tracksuits for solidarity with blue collar workers, necklace of beads for lynching victims, etc) Calling it a “black power salute” is really reductive and it’s a shame (and predictable) that if it’s taught at all, that’s what it’s boiled down to.

Another thing I didn’t know: the Australian guy who came in second wore a patch for solidarity with them, he was protesting racist Australian immigration policies. When he passed away, Smith and Carlos were pallbearers at his funeral.

Don’t know what this is referring to? Here you go.

This is really powerful.

Wow, I had no idea about the solidarity patch.

This is still so powerful to watch.

(fyi Australian guy’s name is Peter Norman, he was banned from competing internationally for Australia after this, because our government can be a real sack of dicks sometimes)

I had no idea there was so much going on here. It’s fascinating. According to the Wiki article:

The two U.S. athletes received their medals shoeless, but wearing black socks, to represent black poverty. Smith wore a black scarf around his neck to represent black pride, Carlos had his tracksuit top unzipped to show solidarity with all blue collar workers in the U.S. and wore a necklace of beads which he described “were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the middle passage.” All three athletes wore Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) badges after Norman, a critic of Australia’s White Australia Policy, expressed empathy with their ideals. Sociologist Harry Edwards, the founder of the OPHR, had urged black athletes to boycott the games; reportedly, the actions of Smith and Carlos on 16 October 1968 were inspired by Edwards’ arguments. Both U.S. athletes intended on bringing black gloves to the event, but Carlos forgot his…It was…Peter Norman, who suggested Carlos wear Smith’s left-handed glove, this being the reason behind him raising his left hand…differing from the traditional Black Power salute. When “The Star-Spangled Banner” played, Smith and Carlos delivered the salute with heads bowed, a gesture which became front page news around the world. As they left the podium they were booed by the crowd. Smith later said “If I win, I am American, not a black American. But if I did something bad, then they would say I am a Negro. We are black and we are proud of being black. Black America will understand what we did tonight.

Every time I learn more about this part of history, I think angrily back to the co-worker who once suggested that a Nazi swastika carried the same level of hate as any kind of Black Power salute/symbol.

At the time I knew next to nothing about Black Power (and I still probably only know a tiny bit). So while I knew she was way off-base (because of those two only the Nazis perpetrated genocide, obv, so there is absolutely no comparing them whatsoever!), I didn’t disagree with her as vehemently as I should have, due to my own ignorance.

It pisses me off that for me, the Black History Month education I received in school basically stopped after the 1960s. Hell, we weren’t even taught anything about Mandella, and this was the late 90s. I’m 28, and it’s only in the past five years that I fully realized that there was lots of European colonization in African countries! Somehow in my absorption of knowledge throughout my life and history education I’ve received, that stuff never made its way in front of me, and I didn’t know enough to look or ask.

But I realize even the anger I have about not being informed about more of the struggles and organized protest and activism from African-descended people (be it American, Canadian, etc), is a sign of white privilege, because I was able to go through most of my life without ever needing to think about it much.

Anyways. History education is important, and it needs to be holistic and inclusive because fuck it, history is not all about the white dudes in power.

I love this. The photo is one of my favorite images, and the act itself is thunderous. I like the commentary up top, too.

I do want to quibble with one bit from further up the thread, though: "Calling it a “black power salute” is really reductive and it’s a shame (and predictable) that if it’s taught at all, that’s what it’s boiled down to."

I would argue against it being a shame or reductive, personally. Black Power was never just black liberation. It was liberation, it was anti-police brutality, it was food clothes and shelter, it was education, it was helping the needy, it was uplifting the community—it was a platform to make the world better for everyone, not just Negroes. Bobby Seale was explicit about the struggle being one of class and economics, not race. Race was a side effect, a pressing issue, but if you could tackle the class aspects, you could better everyone’s lives, including our own.

And obviously there’s levels to this, depending on where you stand as far as black nationalism, isolationism, violence, protest, and so on, but overall, I am happy to call this a Black Power Salute and all the meaning and subtext behind it.

I’ve never seen this is in motion. Powerful stuff.

(Source: bloggingisnotwriting)

Posted 8 months ago

kili-fili-and-frilly:

And for all these reasons, I’ve decided to scalp you, and burn your village to the ground.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING

(Source: goslinger)

Posted 8 months ago
A study on masculinity and aggression from the University of South Florida found that innocuous – yet feminine – tasks could produce profound anxiety in men. As part of the study, a group of men were asked to perform a stereotypically feminine act – braiding hair in this case — while a control group braided rope. Following the act, the men were given the option to either solve a puzzle or punch a heavy bag. Not surprisingly, the men who performed the task that threatened their masculinity were far more likely to punch the bag; again, violence serving as a way to reestablish their masculine identity. A follow-up had both groups punch the bag after braiding either hair or rope; the men who braided the hair punched the bag much harder. A third experiment, all the participants braided hair, but were split into two groups: those who got to punch the bag afterwards and those who didn’t. The men who were prevented from punching the bag started to show acute signs of anxiety and distress from not being able to reconfirm their masculinity.

Doctor Nerdlove, "When Masculinity Fails Men." (via jazzcatte)

lol men are children

(via yuriadventure)

lmao “punch a heavy bag”

(Source: sepiacircus)

Posted 8 months ago

iamdavidbrothers:

Gangster Party Line (by BrentWeinbach)

wild nsfw, but I’m dying

I’m in tears.

Posted 9 months ago

rare-basement:

rilgon:

thepeoplesrecord:

Prison Labor Exposed: From Starbucks to Microsoft - A sampling of what US prisoners make & for whom
May 21, 2013

Tens of thousands of US inmates are paid from pennies to minimum wage—minus fines and victim compensation—for everything from grunt work to firefighting to specialized labor.

The breaded chicken patty your child bites into at school may have been made by a worker earning twenty cents an hour, not in a faraway country, but by a member of an invisible American workforce: prisoners. At the UnionCorrectional Facility, a maximum security prison in Florida, inmates from a nearby lower-security prison manufacture tons of processed beef, chicken and pork for Prison Rehabilitative Industries and Diversified Enterprises (PRIDE), a privately held non-profit corporation that operates the state’s forty-one work programs. In addition to processed food, PRIDE’s website reveals an array of products for sale through contracts with private companies, from eyeglasses to office furniture, to be shipped from a distribution center in Florida to businesses across the US. PRIDE boasts that its work programs are “designed to provide vocational training, to improve prison security, to reduce the cost of state government, and to promote the rehabilitation of the state inmates.”

And Each month, California inmates process more than 680,000 pounds of beef, 400,000 pounds of chicken products, 450,000 gallons of milk, 280,000 loaves of bread, and 2.9 million eggs (from 160,000 inmate-raised hens).Starbucks subcontractor Signature Packaging Solutions has hired Washington prisoners to package holiday coffees (as well as Nintendo Game Boys). Confronted by a reporter in 2001, a Starbucks rep called the setup “entirely consistent with our mission statement.”

Texas inmates produce brooms and brushes, bedding and mattresses, toilets, sinks, showers, and bullwhips.

In Texas, prisoners make officers’ duty belts, handcuff cases, and prison-cell accessories. California convicts make gun containers, creepers (to peek under vehicles), and human-silhouette targets.

A stitch in time: California inmates sew their own garb. In the 1990s, subcontractor Third Generation hired 35 female South Carolina inmates to sew lingerie and leisure wear for Victoria’s Secret and JCPenney. In 1997, a California prison put two men in solitary for telling journalists they were ordered to replace “Made in Honduras” labels on garments with “Made in the usa.”

Open wide: At California’s prison dental laboratory, inmates produce a complete prosthesis selection, including custom trays, try-ins, bite blocks, and dentures.

Constructive criticism: Prisoners in for burglary, battery, drug and gun charges, and escape helped build a Wal-Mart distribution center in Wisconsin in 2005, until community uproar halted the program. (Company policy says, “Forced or prison labor will not be tolerated by Wal-Mart.”)

On call: Its inmate call centers are the “best kept secret in outsourcing,” Unicor boasts. In 1994, a contractor for gop congressional hopeful Jack Metcalf hired Washington state prisoners to call and remind voters he was pro-death penalty. Metcalf, who prevailed, said he never knew.

Federal Prison Industries, a.k.a. Unicor, says that in addition to soldiers’ uniforms, bedding, shoes, helmets, and flak vests, inmates have “produced missile cables (including those used on the Patriot missiles during the Gulf War)” and “wiring harnesses for jets and tanks.” In 1997, according to Prison Legal NewsBoeing subcontractor MicroJet had prisoners cutting airplane components, paying $7 an hour for work that paid union wages of $30 on the outside.

Full article

Behold, modern-day slavery. If you ever wondered why shit like the war on drugs continues despite its obvious societal damage, here you go! Notice how lots of these are also being done at private, for-profit prisons, and wonder hypothetically who’s pocketing the difference between the dehumanizing “wage” these prisoners get and the price the goods are sold to the end destination. (hint: it’s the people who own these privatized prisons)

Pity that the article neglects to mention Angola Penitentiary, though. It’s a state penitentiary in Louisiana that’s on what used to be a slave labor cotton plantation… and they still make the mostly-black prison population go out into the fields (which are still kept in shape) and pick cotton! Oh boy!

Angola also has a show for the public called the Angola Prison Rodeo, where inmates ride and wrestle angry animals. This is often excused as raising money for prisoner education, but the money goes to prisoner RELIGIOUS education.

"Among born-again Christians, [warden] Cain is revered for delivering hundreds of incarcerated sinners to the Lord—running the nation’s largest maximum-security prison, as one evangelical publication put it, “with an iron fist and an even stronger love for Jesus.”

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2011/07/burl-cain-angola-prison

Pretty sickening stuff.

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

Posted 10 months ago

ombrophilia:

this is literally my favorite map in the history of maps

(Source: zamielherbei)

Posted 10 months ago
Posted 11 months ago

/var/null: Don't Fly During Ramadan

johndarnielle:

chimeracoder:

A couple of weeks ago, I was scheduled to take a trip from New York (JFK) to Los Angeles on JetBlue. Every year, my family goes on a one-week pilgrimage, where we put our work on hold and spend time visiting temples, praying, and spending time with family and friends. To my Jewish friends, I often…

please read this story all the way through

we need to do something about this kind of thing, no-one can reasonably believe this is an isolated incident and people deserve better than to be treated like this

Posted 11 months ago

sandandglass:

Jessica Williams proposes applying New York’s Stop and Frisk policy to Wall Street bankers. 

"Business Harlem" is so good.